This site is dedicated to an exploration of sustainability – what it means and what is required for humanity to transition to a future in which people everywhere live well, and in harmony with the non-human world on which we are all dependent.

In other words, how do we create sustainable places – at the global and local scale.

– the concept and history of sustainability itself

– a systems perspective of global sustainability

– models that facilitate an understanding of
system behaviour

Why Finkel is wrong on storage

The Finkel review proposes an obligation (under certain circumstances) on renewable generation projects to be able to dispatch a set proportion of their nameplate capacity, a requirement that in reality will force generators to either install or contract energy storage. Not only is this an impediment to investment in renewable energy projects, it will lead to sub-optimal storage outcomes that will be paid for by consumers.

Simulating sustainability

A global population – economy – resource model explores the future impact of declining resource availability on the world economy. The model tracks the likely future consumption of renewable resources, fossil fuels and non-renewable materials and the economic impact of availability.

Beyond the Death Spiral

Model based projections for the rapid uptake of rooftop solar photovoltaics in Western Australia indicate that private capacity will be so large that the centralised network based electricity system will become disrupted in the 2020s. By 2050 private systems may produce around 85- 90% of projected electricity demands. In the interim period it may be more economically viable to avoid introducing large scale renewable energy to the network while planning for a completely renewable system by 2050 when rooftop solar approaches saturation levels.

Coal fired power – twin elephants in the room

Ever since the South Australia blackout, debate has raged about the role of coal vs renewables in meeting Australia’s future electricity generation needs. The debate was ramped up significantly by the Prime Minister’s recent call for new generation coal to underpin future baseload power. However, energy market experts believe the cost of future coal will not stack up against the alternatives, it would undermine our commitment to reduce emissions and overlooks the practical realities of private solar PV on baseload power, and the dwindling global stocks of fossil fuels.